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The College Administrator’s Survival Guide by C.K. Gunsalus has a new edition. Click here to check it out.

In Teaching Ethics: Instructional Models, Methods, and Modalities for University Studies, follow Elizabeth A. Luckman and C.K. Gunsalus as they explore common ethical missteps, and offer tested and effective approaches for teaching approaches to counteract them. In their chapter of Teaching Ethics: Instructional Models, Methods, and Modalities for University Studies, Luckman and Gunsalus review research on ethical decision-making and connect this to the pedagogical goals of teaching ethics to students in a classroom setting. They offer a variety of exercises focused on academic based decision-making that can be easily adapted to any class. Educators seeking to teach ethical decision-making can adapt the exercises described for any student body in any area of academic study. This chapter’s exercises are meant to challenge readers and get them to think more critically, and solidifying good habits in decision making. 

EAL DULUTH 2021

Excellence in Academic Leadership: DULUTH 2021

Greetings and welcome to the Excellence in Academic Leadership (EAL) program presented by the National Center for Principled Leadership & Research Ethics (NCPRE). Our goal is to support your growth as an academic leader. The program will be offered through online group Zoom sessions augmented by outside readings and your reflections and analyses.

You are in a cohort with colleagues from Western Michigan University, tailored to your interests, and supported by resources in the NCPRE online Leadership Collection. NCPRE creates and shares resources to support better ethical and leadership practices in academic and other professional contexts. Leadership—and particularly ethical leadership—is central to creating a culture that establishes healthy and productive professional interactions. We equip you with evidence-based tools to support intentional leadership development and institutional integrity.

Your cohort’s presenters are Ann Briggs Addo, BrandE Faupell, and C. K. Gunsalus. Henry Strehlow is your Cohort Coordinator and will be your main point of contact for scheduling and logistics. All of the members of our Excellence in Academic Leadership team can be found here.

We are planning 1.5 hour online meetings once a month through the academic year. There are a select few topics that require a longer period of two hours; you will receive advance notice of at least a month before those sessions. Each meeting will focus around a particular topic and include related resources available for you to pursue as your interests direct. Other than these online meetings, you will be in control of how much external time you spend; there will be ‘homework’ assignments after each session and it will always be your choice as to the time you devote.

Please feel free to contact Henry Strehlow, the Cohort Coordinator for this program, if you have any questions: strehlo1@illinois.edu

General Reference Materials:

Session One: The Special Challenges of the Academic Environment

Session Date:   CDT

Prior to our Zoom Call on Thursday afternoon, we ask that you watch this short vignette that was filmed as part of our larger Leadership Collection. This particular clip features a faculty member named “Professor Major” having a conversation with a new Department Head on his first day.

As you watch the scene unfold and the behavior of the characters within it, we invite you to think about what is really happening in this interaction. Please consider the questions posed within the video and write some thoughts down in the Journal we have asked you to maintain as part of the program.

We will begin Thursday’s session by discussing this scenario, after which we will take some time to explore the unique challenges our environment presents.

Pre-Session Materials:

[Slide Deck Reference (for Personal Use Only)]:

  • [EAL Slide Link]

Homework Assigned

  • We invite you all to take a look through NCPRE’s Leadership Collection. This library of resources has been developed over several years, built on the experiences and wisdom of our experts. The collection includes Quick Tips, Executive Briefings and Annotated Bibliographies, as well as many video interviews with our experts themselves sharing their thoughts on a variety of subjects. Please take some time to browse the collection – during our second session we will ask each of you to share a couple of the assets you found most interesting or useful.
  • Find attached the Testing Yourself exercise and take a few minutes to respond to the prompts within. We will discuss these prompts and share responses in our next session when we dive deeper into handling contentious situations like these.
  • Also attached is a copy of the AUDiT Dashboard, developed by NCPRE to help systematically assess the health of your department. Our observation has been that many leaders tend to focus on areas that they think are problematic. The AUDiT approach helps ensure that your assessment is comprehensive. Use the AUDiT table to score your unit. Start by putting a number in each cell – the more the cell describes your unit, the higher the number should be. In the green and red columns, scores run from 0 to 5; in the yellow column, it is 0 to 3. When you are finished, add up your green scores and subtract the totals from your yellow and red scores. We will be revisiting this tool throughout the course so please keep the original with your journal.

Get Started

About the Leadership Collection

The Leadership Collection was inspired by, and initiated with support and in collaboration with Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. It is a multi-media library of management and leadership materials curated for academic leaders. The Collection is accessible via the Internet, and is updated regularly. The Collection can be used on a “just in time” basis or as a platform for personal study and reflection. Categories of materials in the collection include:

Just-in-Time Collection (I need to know now!)

  • Quick Tips
  • Checklists
  • Videos: how to “do it right”

Leadership Bookcase

  • Resources for the longer-term, travel, and reflection

Deep-Dive Collection (I am looking for deeper knowledge.)

  • Videos: interviews with, and presentations by, experts and authorities
  • Executive Briefings
  • Curated Articles
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • Case Studies
  • Self-Assessments
Leadership Collection resources are research and evidence-based; tailored for the academic environment; and practical. They are built around four leadership competencies Ethical: An ethical leader models, requires, and rewards appropriate professional conduct in personal, interpersonal, and organizational settings. He or she makes principle- and fact-based decisions, seeking consistency among ethical beliefs, values, and conduct. Such a leader encourages exploration of and discussion about the ethical challenges inherent in work life. Strategic: A strategic leader develops and implements long-term goals tied to the organization’s mission. A strategic leader sets SMART (specific, measurable, agreed-upon, realistic, and time-based) goals and aims at achieving long-term goals. Competencies include anticipation of pitfalls, management of budget and resources, prioritizing, use of data to inform decisions, and risk assessment. Influential: An influential leader is a strong communicator, motivating, energizing, and facilitating effective interactions. This leader delegates thoughtfully, provides constructive coaching and mentoring, and conducts meaningful performance evaluations. Influential leaders build strong relationships and use skills of persuasion and negotiation effectively. Adaptive: An adaptive leader uses a range of approaches based on situational needs. Adaptive leaders anticipate, identify, and manage change with flexibility rooted in principled approaches. Adaptive leaders devise creative solutions, implement initiatives, maintain and update their skills and knowledge, and manage stress to be effective leaders of others. © 2016 NCPRE

Additional Material

Leadership Collection Overview (PDF) A Brief Introduction to Leadership Essentials (PDF) Leadership Essentials Part 1: Executive Briefing, part I (PDF) Leadership Essentials:  Executive Briefing, part II (PDF) Tools for Leadership – Annotated Bibliography (PDF)

Meet Our Leaders

  • Meet Andrew Alleyne
  • Meet Michael Loui
  • Meet Rob Rutenbar
  • Meet Barb Wilson
  • Meet Edward Feser
  • Meet Ruth Watkins
  • Meet Joan Dubinsky
  • Meet BrandE Faupell
  • Toggle Title
  • EAL WMU 2021

    Excellence in Academic Leadership: WMU 2021

    Greetings and welcome to the Excellence in Academic Leadership (EAL) program presented by the National Center for Principled Leadership & Research Ethics (NCPRE). Our goal is to support your growth as an academic leader. The program will be offered through online group Zoom sessions augmented by outside readings and your reflections and analyses. You are in a cohort with colleagues from Western Michigan University, tailored to your interests, and supported by resources in the NCPRE online Leadership Collection. NCPRE creates and shares resources to support better ethical and leadership practices in academic and other professional contexts. Leadership—and particularly ethical leadership—is central to creating a culture that establishes healthy and productive professional interactions. We equip you with evidence-based tools to support intentional leadership development and institutional integrity. Your cohort’s presenters are Ann Briggs Addo, BrandE Faupell, and C. K. Gunsalus. Henry Strehlow is your Cohort Coordinator and will be your main point of contact for scheduling and logistics. All of the members of our Excellence in Academic Leadership team can be found here. We are planning 1.5 hour online meetings once a month through the academic year. There are a select few topics that require a longer period of two hours; you will receive advance notice of at least a month before those sessions. Each meeting will focus around a particular topic and include related resources available for you to pursue as your interests direct. Other than these online meetings, you will be in control of how much external time you spend; there will be ‘homework’ assignments after each session and it will always be your choice as to the time you devote. Please feel free to contact Henry Strehlow, the Cohort Coordinator for this program, if you have any questions: strehlo1@illinois.edu

    General Reference Materials:

    Session One: The Special Challenges of the Academic Environment

    Session Date:  09/27/21 CDT

    Prior to our Zoom Call on Thursday afternoon, we ask that you watch this short vignette that was filmed as part of our larger Leadership Collection. This particular clip features a faculty member named “Professor Major” having a conversation with a new Department Head on his first day. As you watch the scene unfold and the behavior of the characters within it, we invite you to think about what is really happening in this interaction. Please consider the questions posed within the video and write some thoughts down in the Journal we have asked you to maintain as part of the program. We will begin Thursday’s session by discussing this scenario, after which we will take some time to explore the unique challenges our environment presents.

    Pre-Session Materials:

    [Slide Deck Reference (for Personal Use Only)]:

    • [EAL Slide Link]

    Homework Assigned

    • We invite you all to take a look through NCPRE’s Leadership Collection. This library of resources has been developed over several years, built on the experiences and wisdom of our experts. The collection includes Quick Tips, Executive Briefings and Annotated Bibliographies, as well as many video interviews with our experts themselves sharing their thoughts on a variety of subjects. Please take some time to browse the collection – during our second session we will ask each of you to share a couple of the assets you found most interesting or useful.
    • Find attached the Testing Yourself exercise and take a few minutes to respond to the prompts within. We will discuss these prompts and share responses in our next session when we dive deeper into handling contentious situations like these.
    • Also attached is a copy of the AUDiT Dashboard, developed by NCPRE to help systematically assess the health of your department. Our observation has been that many leaders tend to focus on areas that they think are problematic. The AUDiT approach helps ensure that your assessment is comprehensive. Use the AUDiT table to score your unit. Start by putting a number in each cell – the more the cell describes your unit, the higher the number should be. In the green and red columns, scores run from 0 to 5; in the yellow column, it is 0 to 3. When you are finished, add up your green scores and subtract the totals from your yellow and red scores. We will be revisiting this tool throughout the course so please keep the original with your journal.

    Helpie FAQ

    Meet Our Leaders

  • Meet Andrew Alleyne
  • Meet Michael Loui
  • Meet Rob Rutenbar
  • Meet Barb Wilson
  • Meet Edward Feser
  • Meet Ruth Watkins
  • Meet Joan Dubinsky
  • Meet BrandE Faupell
  • Toggle Title
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    Meet Our Leaders

  • Meet Andrew Alleyne
  • Meet Michael Loui
  • Meet Rob Rutenbar
  • Meet Barb Wilson
  • Meet Edward Feser
  • Meet Ruth Watkins
  • Meet Joan Dubinsky
  • Meet BrandE Faupell
  • Toggle Title
  •   Quick Tips
     
      Videos
     
      Mastery
     
    Leadership Collection
     
    Follow us on Twitter @ncprenews or check out #leadershipcollection to stay informed about our monthly updates.
     

    Leadership Collection

    EAL

    Excellence in Academic Leadership

    If you are interested in forming a cohort for your institution, seeking a seat in an individual-enrollment EAL program, or have any questions, please contact NCPRE at ethicsctr@illinois.edu
    Excellence in Academic Leadership (EAL) is a professional development program tailored to develop the skills needed to survive and thrive while navigating the special challenges of the academic environment. Through highly interactive programs, sitting and emerging academic leaders consider and practice proven, relentlessly practical tools that can be put into immediate use. Program participants gain concepts and skills needed for dealing with unpleasant and costly elements of interpersonal interactions, those that too often drive people out of leadership positions or that underlie dysfunction in academic units. This is our focus

    “The sessions I selected [as favorites] were not just practical for academic department head leadership, rather, have been very helpful to developing who I am as a leader in my research and project groups. I have found the philosophy of leading with intention: understanding the mission and keeping people focused on that.”

    Effective leadership creates and sustains inclusive working environments that advance the unit or organization’s mission at a high level of quality and integrity. NCPRE’s program is rooted in its philosophy of Cultures of Excellence: excellence encompasses more than just what work is done, but also how it is done–with rigor, reproducibility,  meaningful inclusion, and integrity. 

    “This really helped remind me that to be put in a leadership position is both an honor and a chore, but it’s best to look at it as a responsibility and an opportunity. This course really helped me feel good about the leadership positions I am in. It reminded me how important the good leaders I have and have had in my life have been to me personally and has re-energized me to try and be a strong, trustworthy, reliable leader. This class has made me stand up straighter.” 

    Participants build skills for making and implementing decisions required in leadership positions and the conversations that follow. By applying tools and skills to case studies, cohort members work together to develop solutions and approaches to many of the unique hurdles of the academic environment. The program presents strategies for building vibrant academic units and bully-proofing challenged units. Participants are encouraged to evaluate their own leadership needs and growth throughout the program and to reflect on their role and impact as an academic leader.
    Over the course of an academic year, participants engage through synchronous online sessions with their cohort, limited to no more than fifteen members. Time between sessions allows for reflection which facilitates deeper learning and exploration of NCPRE’s extensive online Leadership Collection, which includes both videos with experienced academic leaders and a range of written resources from just-in-time Quick Tips to deeper dive Executive Briefings. 

    “The component of this experience that will have lasting value is the relationships that I have built with a group of like minded leaders who are developing the same skills that I am. They have become my friends and my support system.”

    Leadership is not a solitary endeavor, and the networks formed within our cohorts are among the program’s strongest assets. Refined through many years of feedback from online and in-person program participants, the content and small cohort model assists participants in building personally-fitting skills and provides ongoing opportunities to practice them. 

    “The [EAL] program not only gave me tools and strategies to be a better person at academic work place but also at my home and other business endeavors that I am involved in.”

              
    Topics covered include 
      • Building Cultures of Excellence 
      • Giving and Receiving Feedback
      • Managing Difficult Conversations
      • Exploring Leadership in Academia
      • Building unit vibrancy, working effectively to improve challenged academic units
      • Negotiation 
      • Effective inclusion
      • Critical Friends: a proven approach to group problem-solving for academic leaders
      • Use of the Academic Unit Diagnostic Tool (AUDiT)
      • Bullyproofing Academic Units
      • Conflict resolution
      • Listening and asking questions
      • Effective mentoring and feedback, career development 
      • Other topics, as agreed with cohort, liaison

    Participant Testimonials

    You know to be perfectly honest, sometimes trainings like this are kind of a waste of time, or offer only a few nuggets of good advice … but this one was just phenomenal. I wish I would have had a warning that this was going to be so good.”
    You provided us with so many tools that I hadn’t really considered to be tools. It seemed like a common theme in many of the lessons was to always come back to finding common ground – why are we here? Because of the students. That was a huge realization for me.”
    “The program exposed areas for me to continue to develop and improve on as a leader.”
    “Thank you for providing a space for this group of people to get together to share ideas. I looked forward to these sessions and came away with new ideas to chew on after each meeting”
    “I have used the critical friends group.  I have recentered conversations around policy and procedure when colleagues have tried to overstep bounds.  I am working to become a better listener. I have a different outlook on how to use my time as a leader to accomplish something more than just maintaining the status quo.”
    “This program gave me a lot to think about re leadership, from defining who I am and aspire to be as a leader to giving me specific skills (e.g., scripts, decision-making framework, negotiation tactics, etc.) to use from a leadership perspective.”
    “Robert Easter is an outstanding resource. He is an exemplary leader who is experienced, poised, and savvy. I would love to have him as a mentor!”

    These videos are part of a series of videos on Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) produced by the Office of Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.




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